While searching for the best book for advanced java programming, it is imperative that you know where to download them at once. STUVERA.COM has an extensive list of some of the best java books for advanced programmers. These books are like  a programmers companion when learning all they have to about java.

Timeless  classics on java programming, current editions of books and the most recent texts on advanced java programming can be downloaded for free on STUVERA. Aside from finding some of my recommended books on their website, many other books on java programming are on their website.

 

1. JavaScript: The Good Parts

JavaScript: The Good Parts

Most programming languages contain good and bad parts, but JavaScript has more than its share of the bad, having been developed and released in a hurry before it could be refined. This authoritative book scrapes away these bad features to reveal a subset of JavaScript that’s more reliable, readable, and maintainable than the language as a whole–a subset you can use to create truly extensible and efficient code.

Considered the JavaScript expert by many people in the development community, author Douglas Crockford identifies the abundance of good ideas that make JavaScript an outstanding object-oriented programming language-ideas such as functions, loose typing, dynamic objects, and an expressive object literal notation. Unfortunately, these good ideas are mixed in with bad and downright awful ideas, like a programming model based on global variables.

When Java applets failed, JavaScript became the language of the Web by default, making its popularity almost completely independent of its qualities as a programming language. In JavaScript: The Good Parts, Crockford finally digs through the steaming pile of good intentions and blunders to give you a detailed look at all the genuinely elegant parts of JavaScript, including:

Syntax
Objects
Functions
Inheritance
Arrays
Regular expressions
Methods
Style
Beautiful features
The real beauty? As you move ahead with the subset of JavaScript that this book presents, you’ll also sidestep the need to unlearn all the bad parts. Of course, if you want to find out more about the bad parts and how to use them badly, simply consult any other JavaScript book.

With JavaScript: The Good Parts, you’ll discover a beautiful, elegant, lightweight and highly expressive language that lets you create effective code, whether you’re managing object libraries or just trying to get Ajax to run fast. If you develop sites or applications for the Web, this book is an absolute must.

2. Effective Java

There should not be any surprise here. Effective Java by Joshua Bloch is hands down best Java book ever. This is a definite must-read book for Java programmers of any experience level. You will learn so much about Java and its API then you could imagine.

The fact that Joshua Bloch himself is the author of several key Java classes and API, e.g. java.lang and Java Collection framework, is enough reason to read this book.  Along with that, his writing style is also fantastic.

You can read this book on a beach, while traveling, or just at your desk. It’s awesome. There is no doubt that you would emerge as better Java programmer after reading this book.

And the best thing is that a new edition of Effective Java is available now, which covers Java 7, 8, and 9. There cannot be a better time to read this book.

3.The Pragmatic Programmer: From Journeyman to Master

The Pragmatic Programmer: From Journeyman to Master

Ward Cunningham Straight from the programming trenches, The Pragmatic Programmer cuts through the increasing specialization and technicalities of modern software development to examine the core process–taking a requirement and producing working, maintainable code that delights its users. It covers topics ranging from personal responsibility and career development to architectural techniques for keeping your code flexible and easy to adapt and reuse. Read this book, and youll learn how to *Fight software rot; *Avoid the trap of duplicating knowledge; *Write flexible, dynamic, and adaptable code; *Avoid programming by coincidence; *Bullet-proof your code with contracts, assertions, and exceptions; *Capture real requirements; *Test ruthlessly and effectively; *Delight your users; *Build teams of pragmatic programmers; and *Make your developments more precise with automation. Written as a series of self-contained sections and filled with entertaining anecdotes, thoughtful examples, and interesting analogies, The Pragmatic Programmer illustrates the best practices and major pitfalls of many different aspects of software development. Whether youre a new coder, an experienced programm

4. Clean Code

Another timeless classic for Java programmers is Clean Code. As the title suggests, it teaches you to write better code, which is such a difficult thing to learn. To be honest, it’s easy to learn Java, but difficult to write better Java code which uses strong OOP principles and that’s where this book helps.

Similar to Joshua Bloch, Robert C. Martin, also known as Uncle Bob, is an excellent author and shares a lot of his experience as a software developer, teaching you various programming techniques and practices that help a lot in your day-to-day job as a programmer.

5.JavaScript: The Definitive Guide

JavaScript: The Definitive Guide

This Fifth Edition is completely revised and expanded to cover JavaScript as it is used in today’s Web 2.0 applications. This book is both an example-driven programmer’s guide and a keep-on-your-desk reference, with new chapters that explain everything you need to know to get the most out of JavaScript, including:

Scripted HTTP and Ajax XML processing Client-side graphics using the canvas tag Namespaces in JavaScript–essential when writing complex programs Classes, closures, persistence, Flash, and JavaScript embedded in Java applications

Part I explains the core JavaScript language in detail. If you are new to JavaScript, it will teach you the language. If you are already a JavaScript programmer, Part I will sharpen your skills and deepen your understanding of the language.

Part II explains the scripting environment provided by web browsers, with a focus on DOM scripting with unobtrusive JavaScript. The broad and deep coverage of client-side JavaScript is illustrated with many sophisticated examples that demonstrate how to:

Generate a table of contents for an HTML document Display DHTML animations Automate form validation Draw dynamic pie charts Make HTML elements draggable Define keyboard shortcuts for web applications Create Ajax-enabled tool tips Use XPath and XSLT on XML documents loaded with Ajax And much more

Part III is a complete reference for core JavaScript. It documents every class, object, constructor, method, function, property, and constant defined by JavaScript 1.5 and ECMAScript Version 3.

Part IV is a reference for client-side JavaScript, covering legacy web browser APIs, the standard Level 2 DOM API, and emerging standards such as the XMLHttpRequest object and the canvas tag.
More than 300,000 JavaScript programmers around the world have made this their indispensable reference book for building JavaScript applications.

“A must-have reference for expert JavaScript programmers…well-organized and detailed.”

 

7.Java Concurrency in Practice

Java Concurrency in Practice

“I was fortunate indeed to have worked with a fantastic team on the design and implementation of the concurrency features added to the Java platform in Java 5.0 and Java 6. Now this same team provides the best explanation yet of these new features, and of concurrency in general. Concurrency is no longer a subject for advanced users only. Every Java developer should read this book.”
–Martin Buchholz
JDK Concurrency Czar, Sun Microsystems

“For the past 30 years, computer performance has been driven by Moore’s Law; from now on, it will be driven by Amdahl’s Law. Writing code that effectively exploits multiple processors can be very challenging. Java Concurrency in Practice provides you with the concepts and techniques needed to write safe and scalable Java programs for today’s–and tomorrow’s–systems.”
–Doron Rajwan
Research Scientist, Intel Corp

“This is the book you need if you’re writing–or designing, or debugging, or maintaining, or contemplating–multithreaded Java programs. If you’ve ever had to synchronize a method and you weren’t sure why, you owe it to yourself and your users to read this book, cover to cover.”
–Ted Neward
Author of Effective Enterprise Java

“Brian addresses the fundamental issues and complexities of concurrency with uncommon clarity. This book is a must-read for anyone who uses threads and cares about performance.”
–Kirk Pepperdine
CTO, JavaPerformanceTuning.com

“This book covers a very deep and subtle topic in a very clear and concise way, making it the perfect Java Concurrency reference manual. Each page is filled with the problems (and solutions!) that programmers struggle with every day. Effectively exploiting concurrency is becoming more and more important now that Moore’s Law is delivering more cores but not faster cores, and this book will show you how to do it.”
–Dr. Cliff Click
Senior Software Engineer, Azul Systems

“I have a strong interest in concurrency, and have probably written more thread deadlocks and made more synchronization mistakes than most programmers. Brian’s book is the most readable on the topic of threading and concurrency in Java, and deals with this difficult subject with a wonderful hands-on approach. This is a book I am recommending to all my readers of The Java Specialists’ Newsletter, because it is interesting, useful, and relevant to the problems facing Java developers today.”
–Dr. Heinz Kabutz
The Java Specialists’ Newsletter

“I’ve focused a career on simplifying simple problems, but this book ambitiously and effectively works to simplify a complex but critical subject: concurrency. Java Concurrency in Practice is revolutionary in its approach, smooth and easy in style, and timely in its delivery–it’s destined to be a very important book.”
–Bruce Tate
Author of Beyond Java

 Java Concurrency in Practice is an invaluable compilation of threading know-how for Java developers. I found reading this book intellectually exciting, in part because it is an excellent introduction to Java’s concurrency API, but mostly because it captures in a thorough and accessible way expert knowledge on threading not easily found elsewhere.”
–Bill Venners
Author of Inside the Java Virtual Machine

Threads are a fundamental part of the Java platform. As multicore processors become the norm, using concurrency effectively becomes essential for building high-performance applications. Java SE 5 and 6 are a huge step forward for the development of concurrent applications, with improvements to the Java Virtual Machine to support high-performance, highly scalable concurrent classes and a rich set of new concurrency building blocks. In Java Concurrency in Practice , the creators of these new facilities explain not only how they work and how to use them, but also the motivation and design patterns behind them.

However, developing, testing, and debugging multithreaded programs can still be very difficult; it is all too easy to create concurrent programs that appear to work, but fail when it matters most: in production, under heavy load. Java Concurrency in Practice arms readers with both the theoretical underpinnings and concrete techniques for building reliable, scalable, maintainable concurrent applications. Rather than simply offering an inventory of concurrency APIs and mechanisms, it provides design rules, patterns, and mental models that make it easier to build concurrent programs that are both correct and performant.

This book covers:

Basic concepts of concurrency and thread safety Techniques for building and composing thread-safe classes Using the concurrency building blocks in java.util.concurrent Performance optimization dos and don’ts Testing concurrent programs Advanced topics such as atomic variables, nonblocking algorithms, and the Java Memory Model

CURRENT ADVANCED JAVA BOOKS FOR DOWNLOAD

8. Spring in Action

Sorry, but I have to include one Spring book, Spring in Action, in this list of classic books for Java programmers. Spring is the most popular Java framework ever and this is the best book to learn about the Spring framework, but — to be honest — this book is much more than a Spring book.

After reading the 4th Edition of this book, I realized so much about Java and writing better code that I can’t begin to explain.

The books take a topic, e.g. JDBC, and explain where JDK went wrong and how Spring corrects that mistake, e.g. SQLException, a one-size-fits-all exception that says something is wrong but not exactly what is wrong or how to deal with that.

Like Josuha Bloch and Uncle Bob, Craig Walls is another great author and you will learn much more than just Spring by reading this book.

9. Test Driven

Automation testing is an important skill. For developers, it all starts with unit testing. Java has been blessed to have the JUnit from the start, but just knowing the library doesn’t make you a professional programmer who can write tests.

It takes much more than knowing a unit testing library, like JUnit or Mockito, and that’s where this book helps. If you are serious about code quality and writing unit, integration, and automation test, Test Driven is the book to read in 2018.

1o. The Definitive Guide to Java Performance

Another aspect of becoming a better Java developer is knowing about JVM, Garbage collection, and performance tuning. Though there have been several good books on this topic, e.g. Java Performance by Binu John and Charlie Hunt, The Definitive Guide of Java Performance by Scott Oaks is my favorite.

Even though it only covers until JDK 7, you will learn a lot about performance tuning and JVM in general, which totally justifies the time and money you will spend on this book.

11. Head First Java

How many of you started learning Java by reading this book? Well, I did. Just after I came to know about Head First Design Pattern, I also found this book, Head First Java, and I really enjoyed reading it. I learned a lot of Java concepts and many of my misconceptions were also corrected.

Though many feel this is an out-of-date book, I still feel its a great book for anyone just starting with Java because of its unique style and content.

You can easily learn about Java 8, Java 9, and Java 10 changes on other versions once you know Java by reading this book.

FREE ADVANCED JAVA BOOKS

12. Head First Object-Oriented Analysis and Design

Here is another “Head First” book in the list of the greatest Java books. Yup, they are simply awesome.

Head First Object-Oriented Analysis and Design forms a trilogy of the “Head First” books for Java programmers, i.e. Head First JavaHead First Design Patterns, and Head First OOAD.

It actually complements Head First Design Patterns by explaining the techniques of object-oriented programming and design.

The most important technique that I learned from this book was coding for interfaces and how to encapsulate what changes. This book simply changed how I write Java code.

13. Java: A Beginner’s Guide

If you ever need a comprehensive Java book, this should be it. Even though the title says Java: A Beginner’s Guide, it’s one of the most complete books for learning Java.

Sir Herbert Schildt has also done a commendable job in keeping the book up-to-date, e.g. the 7th Edition of this book now covers Java 9.

Though, I don’t know how he is going to keep this book up-to-date going forward, since Java’s new 6-month release cycle which started with Java 10.

There you go! These are some of the best books for Java programmers. If you are a passionate Java programmer, there is a good chance that you have already read most of these books. But, if you haven’t, then 2018 may be just the right time to read these books. They are absolutely awesome. You can choose the latest version of the book wherever possible, e.g. Effective Java 3rd Edition or the 7th Edition of Java: A Beginner’s Guide.

Find all these books and many other books on advanced java on STUVERA.COM

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